Assessment and Evaluation terminology

 

#  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

 

Accreditation – any ASD school that has students earning credits toward graduation has the potential for being accredited.  An eligible school must apply for accreditation with the Northwest Accreditation Commission.

Return to top of page

 

Achievement Gap the difference between the academic achievements of two groups of students, for example: comparing the academic achievement of African American students to the academic achievement of Caucasian students.

Return to top of page

 

ACT a college entrance test measuring English, mathematics, reading and science.  It assesses the general educational development of high school students and their ability to complete college-level work.

Return to top of page

 

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) proficiency in language arts and mathematics, for schools and school districts, is measured using targets set by the state (see Annual Measureable Objectives).  Adequate Yearly Progress is required by the federal government through the No Child Left Behind Act, and expects all students to be proficient in language arts and mathematics by the 2013-14 school year.

Return to top of page

 

Alaska Standards Based Assessment (SBA) – standardized tests used to determine the extent to which students are meeting statewide performance standards.  The SBAs are administered in early April to all students in grades 3-10 in reading, writing and math.  For grade 10 students, the SBA is combined with the High School Graduation Qualifying Exam (HSGQE) and results are provided in two unique score reports.  Science SBAs are administered to students in grades 4, 8 and 10.

Return to top of page

 

Annual Dropout Rate – the percentage of students, grades 7-12, who drop out of school before completion. Annual dropout rate is calculated by taking the number of dropouts in the current school year and dividing by the number of students enrolled in grades 7-12 on October 1 of the current school year.

Return to top of page

 

Annual Measurable Objective (AMO) – the target percent proficient on statewide assessments (SBA), in language arts and mathematics that schools are to achieve in order to meet AYP. 

               

School Year

AMO for Language Arts

AMO for Mathematics

01-02

64.03%

54.86%

02-03

64.03%

54.86%

03-04

64.03%

54.86%

04-05

71.48%

57.61%

05-06

71.48%

57.61%

06-07

71.48%

57.61%

07-08

77.18%

66.09%

08-09

77.18%

66.09%

09-10

77.18%

66.09%

10-11

82.88%

74.57%

11-12

82.88%

74.57%

12-13

94.28%

91.53%

13-14

100.00%

100.00

Return to top of page

 

Advanced Placement (AP) a program run by College Board that provides high school students with the opportunity to take college-level courses and upon successful completion of a subject based AP test earn college credit.

Return to top of page

 

Aggregate – a total number, for example: days of school, number of students in the district, etc.

Return to top of page

 

Alaska Department of Education and Early Development (DEED) Reporting Protocol – reporting guidelines that schools and districts must follow in order to protect student privacy.  Please see the Protocol for Reporting Results for more information.

Return to top of page

 

Attendance by 90% or more – the percentage of students, who attended school 90% or more of the time they were enrolled. Students considered present include only those who are physically present at the school or who are engaged in school related activities off campus (example: field trip).

Return to top of page

 

Attendance Rate – is calculated by taking the aggregate daily attendance (total # of days students are present while school is in session) and dividing by the aggregate daily membership (total # of days students are absent and present while school is in session).  The result is expressed as a percentage.

 (Top ^)

 

Certificate of Achievement awarded to a student who has met all graduation requirements of the school district and the state but fails to demonstrate proficiency on all three sections of the High School Graduation Qualifying Exam (HSGQE). Students who earn a Certificate of Achievement have the opportunity to retake the HSGQE (either the entire test or whichever subtest they have not passed) in October and April of each year until they are successful.

Return to top of page

 

Cohort a group of students with something in common,  for example: students with the same expected graduation year, same grade level, etc.  A cohort can be a group of students tracked over time (sequential cohort) or a group of students identified by a specific point in time.

Return to top of page

 

Criterion-referenced test a test that measures a student’s academic achievement against specific performance standards.  The score does not compare students with one another but demonstrates how well the student knows the tested content.  The Alaska Standards Based Assessments (SBA) and High School Graduation Qualifying Exam (HSGQE) are criterion-referenced tests.

Return to top of page

 

Disaggregated data (or disaggregation) the process of breaking something into smaller parts.  When data is disaggregated, the scores of a large group of students are separated into smaller groupings (example: race and ethnicity, gender, economically disadvantaged, limited English proficient or students with disabilities).  In education, this practice allows parents and teachers to view more than just the school’s overall test scores; they are able to see how certain student groups are performing.

Return to top of page

 

Dropout – students in grades 7-12, who were enrolled at some time during the school year but ended that enrollment due to various reasons.  This does not include students who:

  • received a diploma from an approved state or district alternate education program
  • transferred to another public school district
  • transferred to a private school
  • transferred to a state or district alternate education program
  • students who are temporarily absent due to suspension
  • students who are absent due to illness or medical condition
  • students who died

Return to top of page

 

Economically Disadvantaged Student (EDS) ‑ a subgroup of students classified as being eligible to participate in the free and reduced lunch program.   For comparison purposes, the Anchorage School District disaggregates (see disaggregated data) the test scores of EDS and Non-EDS students, as required by the Elementary and Secondary Act (ESEA), in order to evaluate student achievement between the two subgroups.

Eligibility -  free and reduced-price lunch program is determined by the income and eligibility levels set by the federal government.  This includes students who:

  • meet the income guidelines
  • students in the Alaska Temporary Assistance Program file provided by the State
  • all students in Provision 3 schools
  • migrant students
  • students with a sibling or siblings already in the program

Return to top of page

 

Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) – the federal law that guides and provides oversight of public education in all fifty states. No

Child Left Behind (NCLB) is the latest revision or authorization of this act.

Return to top of page

 

English Language Proficiency Assessment (ELPA) – is used to monitor student progress in English language proficiency and to serve as a criterion to aid in determining when English Language Learners (ELLs) have attained full language proficiency in the areas of reading, writing, listening and speaking.  Any student identified as a Limited English Proficiency (LEP) student in grades K-12 take the ELPA.  The ELPA is assessed in the spring using the ACCESS testing tool.

Return to top of page

 

EXPLORE – a curriculum-based educational and career planning program that helps grade 8 students, build detailed academic plans. EXPLORE is the entry point to ACT’s College Readiness System that also includes PLAN for grade ten students and the ACT for grade eleven and twelve students.

Return to top of page

 

Fall Online Alaska School Information System (Fall OASIS) – the foundation average daily membership based on the twenty day count period ending the fourth Friday in October.  Fall OASIS is required by the Alaska Department of Education and Early Development and is a major component in state funding.

Return to top of page

 

Full Academic Year (FAY) – the period between October 1 and the first day of spring testing.  Any student who is continuously enrolled during this period is included in the district and state participation calculation.

Return to top of page

 

Grade Level Expectation (GLE) – the knowledge and skills students (kindergarten to grade 10) need to master at the end of the year.  The Standards Based Assessment is closely matched to the GLE’s to measure how successful schools are in teaching all students.

Return to top of page

 

Graduate – A student who has completed all of the requirements of graduation and has successfully passed all sections of the High School Graduation Qualifying Exam (HSGQE).  Graduation requirements »

Return to top of page

 

Growth Model – measuring student progress by tracking achievement scores from one year to the next.   Example:  Comparing the SBA reading scores of grade four students in the 2010-11 school year with the SBA reading scores of the same students, in grade five, during the 2011-12 school year.

Return to top of page

 

Graduation Rate – the percentage of students who graduate high school.  Graduation rate is calculated three ways:  historical method, four-year cohort and five-year cohort.

 

Old Method: (used prior to 2009-10) 


 

Four-year Cohort: (used after 2008-9)


 

Five-year Cohort: (used after 2008-9)


 Return to top of page

 

High School Graduation Qualifying Examination (HSGQE) – used to determine student competency in the areas of reading, writing and mathematics and is one required component for earning a diploma.  The HSGQE results are provided in the form of test scores that reflect the essential skills that students should have as a result of their public school experience.  Students take the HSGQE as a combined SBA/HSGQE assessment for the first time in the spring of grade 10.  Students not showing proficiency on any of the HSGQE subtests may continue to take those subtests during the fall and spring state testing window until proficiency is demonstrated.  Students are allowed to test after high school with an earned Certificate of Achievement from an Alaska public school.

Return to top of page

 

Limited English Proficient (LEP) – any student whose primary language is not English and who has at some point scored below the overall proficiency level on the English Language Proficiency Assessment.

Return to top of page

 

Mean – an average, for example: adding the values of a set of numbers and dividing by the total of numbers in the set.

Return to top of page

 

Mean of the Normal Curve Equivalent (MNCE) – is computed by adding the normal curve equivalent scores of all students in a group, then dividing by the number of students in that group.

Return to top of page

 

Migrant – the migrant program is a federally funded program that serves students whose families travel outside the Anchorage School District boundaries to engage in seasonal fishing or agricultural activities.  Migrant Education Program »

Return to top of page

 

National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) – also known as "the Nation's Report Card," is the only nationally representative and continuing assessment of what America's students know and can do in various subject areas.  The NAEP selects schools and students in grades 4, 8 and 12 using a sampling model to determine participation in reading, mathematics, science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography and the arts assessments.  The NAEP is tested periodically, usually on two-year cycles.

Return to top of page

 

No Child Left Behind (NCLB) – a reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) which was signed into law in 2002.  NCLB holds schools and districts accountable for the academic success of their students by requiring frequent testing and setting standards.

Return to top of page

 

Norm-referenced test – a test that measures a student’s achievement compared to a norm group (a group with similar characteristics, example: all grade five students in the country, who took the same test).  The TerraNova is a norm-reference test.

Return to top of page

 

Participation File – detailed student enrollment information as of the first day of spring SBA (reading) test administration that is required by the Department of Education and Early Development (DEED) and is used in calculating Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).

Return to top of page

 

Percent Change in Enrollment – the percentage difference between the previous school years enrollment on October 1, to the current years enrollment on October 1.

Return to top of page

 

Percentile rank – where your score ranks among others.  For example, if you are in the 75th percentile, your score is 75% higher than all scores from that test.

Return to top of page

 

PLAN – PLAN is the educational and career-planning program for grade 10 students that provide early indicators of college readiness in English, math, reading and science. It is the most powerful predictor of success on the ACT.

Return to top of page

 

PSAT – measures a student’s critical-thinking, math problem-solving and writing skills and provides students with firsthand practice for taking the SAT.

Return to top of page

 

Proficient – the ability to perform at or above grade level expectation.  A proficient score on the SBA is 300 or higher.

Return to top of page

 

Proficiency Level – a student’s current knowledge and skills in a particular content area (reading, writing, mathematics or science) – on the SBA there are four proficiency levels: far below, below, proficient and advanced.

Return to top of page

 

Protocols for reporting assessment results – The Alaska Department of Education and Early Development (DEED) has reporting guidelines that schools and districts must follow in order to protect student privacy.  These protocols require that student assessment data be suppressed using the rules set out by the state.   There are two methods of reporting student assessment data: two categories of achievement and four categories of achievement.

Protocol - Two Categories of Achievement

Protocol - Four Categories of Achievement

Return to top of page

  

Provision 2 and 3 Schools – a special assistance program for school meals set up by Congress. Under the National School Lunch or School Breakfast programs, the provision status allows all students at the school to eat for free. Provision status also reduces the paperwork and meal count burden for the schools after the base year.

 

Provision schools for 2011-12 – Alaska Native Cultural Charter School, Clark Middle School, Fairview Elementary School, Mount Iliamna Elementary School, Mountain View Elementary School, Muldoon Elementary School, North Star Elementary School, Ptarmigan Elementary School, Russian Jack Elementary School, Tyson Elementary School, Whaley School, Williwaw Elementary School, Willow Crest Elementary School, and Wonder Park Elementary School. All students at AVAIL, the Child in Transition Program and McLaughlin were included in the provision 3 category but not their sibling matches.

Return to top of page

 

Quartile – division of student scores into four sections.  The TerraNova 3rd Edition scores are divided into quartiles based on the national norm:

  • First quartile (lowest) includes students who are below the national average.
  • Second and third quartiles (middle) include students who are within the national average range of scores.
  • Fourth quartile (highest) includes students who score above the national average.

Return to top of page

 

Report Card Data Submission – data reported to the Alaska Department of Education and Early Development (DEED) on July 15 of each year.  Submission of this data is required by state law and NCLB.

Return to top of page

 

Retention Rate – how many students in the school (kindergarten through grade 8) were held back.  Retention rate is calculated by dividing the number of students, kindergarten through grade 8, who are being retained on the last day of school by the actual membership on the last day of school.

Return to top of page

 

SAT – a college entrance test that measures critical reading, writing and mathematical reasoning skills needed to be successful academically.  Many colleges and universities use the SAT to determine a student’s college readiness.

Return to top of page

 

Safe Harbor – a school or district can meet AYP if they have a ten percent reduction in the percent of not proficient students, in all subgroups and content areas (language arts and mathematics). This provision was designed to prevent the over-identification of schools not making AYP.

Return to top of page

 

School Year – defined as the 12-month period beginning with July 1 and ending June 30.

Return to top of page

 

Standardized test – a test given with specific directions to ensure identical testing experiences.  For example:  all students start the test at the same time, on the same day, and are given the same directions.

Return to top of page

 

Statistical significance – results that are unlikely to have occurred by chance.

Return to top of page

 

Status Model – looking at a student group (subgroup or grade level) for a specific year or across years.  For example: comparing the reading scores of grade five students in the 2010-11 school year, to the reading scores of grade five students in the 2011-12 school year.

Return to top of page

 

Subgroup – groups of students based on race and ethnicity, gender, economically disadvantaged, limited English proficiency, and students with disabilities.

Return to top of page

 

Summer Online Alaska School Information System (Summer OASIS) – data based on student enrollment for the entire school year, July 1 to June 30.  Summer OASIS is required by the Alaska Department of Education and Early Development and is a major component in the calculation of graduation and dropout rates.

Return to top of page

 

TerraNova, 3rd edition – a norm-referenced standardized test used to measure students against a national norm in reading, language and mathematics.  The TerraNova is given to students in grades 5 and 7 in early February.

Return to top of page

 

Title I – provides federal funding for schools to help students who are behind academically or at risk of falling behind.  Funding is based on the number of low-income students in a school, generally those eligible for the free lunch program.  Title I is intended to supplement, not replace, state and district funds.

Return to top of page

 

Transiency Rate – percent of students who did not attend at least 171 days of school during the school year. 

Return to top of page

 

WorkKeys – a jobs skills assessment used to measure “real world” skills that employers believe are critical to job success in the areas of reading for information, applied mathematics and locating information.  The WorkKeys assessments are given to students in grade 11 during a state test window in November.  State of Alaska regulation also allows seniors the option of taking WorkKeys during the same testing window as juniors in their school.

Return to top of page

 

Zangle – the Anchorage School District’s student information system that serves as the system of record.

Return to top of page

 

Main

Main

Accessibility
Anchorage School District website accessibility and nondiscrimination notice. The Anchorage School District is an equal opportunity provider.