Cultural enrichment programs

Watch this video produced by Title VII promoting cultural enrichment in Anchorage schools.

Title VII Indian Education integrates Alaska Native and American Indian values into a variety of programs to create an enriching connection for students and their families. 

 

Evening Program 

During the school year we offer the Evening Program for students. Where we have tutors, cultural art and open gym. Title VII also has staff throughout the ASD schools to assist the students and to promote academic success in a cultural context. 

 

Apply online,  download a paper application or view program photos

 

Summer Enrichment Program

During the summer months we offer the Summer Enrichment Program to Alaska Native and American Indian students that are entering 1st through 8th grade. There are two sessions in June and July. Students take classes such as Alaska Native Languages, Math, Science, PE, Technology, Cultural Arts, Culinary Arts, and Language Arts.

 

View program photos

 

 

Indigenous cultures of Alaska

 

The Iñupiat and St. Lawrence Island Yup'ik peoples

The Iñupiat are the Alaska Native people, whose traditional territory spans the coastline of Norton Sound on the Bering Sea up to the Arctic Ocean all the way to the Canadian border. A member of the Eskimo–Aleut language family. They are the people of the sea and subsist primarily on whale and seals. They also gather local plants and berries. Iñupiat art includes detailed ivory carving and elaborate skin sewn items for warmth. Their dances tell stories in the movement of the dancers and are very humorous and entertaining.

 

Iñupiat cultural values

“Every Iñupiaq is responsible to all other Iñupiat for the survival of our cultural spirit, and the values and traditions through which it survives. Through our extended family, we retain, teach, and live our Iñupiat way.”



Source: The Alaska Native Knowledge Network

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The Athabascan peoples

The Athabascans are the Alaska Native people of the Na-Dene ethnolinguistic group. They are the indigenous people of the interior of Alaska. In Alaska, there are eleven different Athabascan groups identified by the languages they speak. These are the Dena’ina, Ahtna, Deg Hit’an, Holikachuk, Koyukon, Upper Kuskokwim, Tanana, Tanacross, Upper Tanana, Gwich'in, and Hän. The Alaskan Athabascan people subsist on river fishing, hunting large game such as moose, caribou and seasonal migratory birds, trapping fur-bearing animals and gathering plants and berries. Athabascan art includes intricate floral design beadwork, birch bark baskets, snowshoes and skin sewn items. Athabascan dancers use both skin drums and also have elaborate jig dancing to fiddle music.

 

Athabascan cultural values

“Every Athabascan Is Responsible To All Other Athabaskan For the Survival Of Our Cultural Spirit, and the Values and Traditions Through Which it Survives. Through Our Extended Family, We Retain, Teach, and Live Our Athabascan Way.”

 

Source: The Alaska Native Knowledge Network

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The Eyak, Haida, Tsimshian, and Tlingit peoples

The Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian are the Indigenous people of the South East region of Alaska. Tlingit and Eyak are a part of the Na-Dene language family, while the Haida and Tsimshian are in a language class of their own. They have a heavy emphasis placed upon family and kinship, and on a rich oral history. Subsistence is mainly fish and the bounty of the ocean. Art is incorporated into all aspects of daily life and is very elaborate. Such as wood carvings that include form line design telling stories and portraying their history. Their dancing is very theatrical with elaborate regalia of button robes with silver and abalone jewelry.

 

Southeast cultural values

"Respect for self and others, including elders. Remembering native traditions, families, sharing, loyalty, pride, and loving children. Responsibility, truth and wise use of words. Care of subsistence areas, care of property. Reverence for the Great Spirit. Sense of humility, Care of human body, dignity, peace with the family, neighbors, and with others, and the world of nature."

 

Source: The Alaska Native Knowledge Network

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The Unangax and Alutiiq (Sugpiaq) peoples

The Alutiiq, Unangax and Sugpiaq are the indigenous people of the Aleutian Islands. They are all a part of the Eskimo–Aleut language family. Their subsistence diet is mainly salmon, crabs, shellfish, and cod, as well as harvesting sea mammals such as seal, walrus and whales. Artwork includes items such as the aleut hunting hats, basket weaving, wood and bone carving, beadwork and skin sewing. They are great navigators of the sea.

 

Alutiiq cultural values

"The way of our beginning, our ancestors. Our people’s land and sea around here. Believe in them and keep them going through time. For the coming generations that we don’t see yet, for their time here."

 

Source: The Alaska Native Knowledge Network

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The Yup'ik and Cup'ik peoples

The Yupik are the indigenous peoples of the SouthWestern region of Alaska from Bristol Bay up to the Norton Sound. They are the largest Alaska Native population in the state. Yup’ik and Cup’ik is a part of the Eskimo–Aleut language family. They subsist off the sea on a diet primarily of whale and seals. They also gather local plants and berries. Yup’ik artwork includes detailed ivory carvings, basketry and skin sewing. They are also known for their great story-kniving and dancing called, “Yuraq.”

 

“Every Yup'ik Is Responsible To All Other Yup'iks For Survival Of Our Cultural Spirit, And The Values And Traditions Through Which It Survives. Through Our Extended Family, We Retain, Teach, and Live Our Yup'ik Way.”

 

Source: The Alaska Native Knowledge Network

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Iñupiat and St. Lawrence Island Yup'ik

Map of Alaska showing the region in which Inupiaq people originate.The Iñupiat are the Alaska Native people, whose traditional territory spans the coastline of Norton Sound on the Bering Sea up to the Arctic Ocean all the way to the Canadian border. More »

 

 

 

Athabascan

Map of Alaska showing the region in which Athabascan people originate.The Athabascan are the indigenous people of the interior of Alaska. More »

Eyak, Haida, Tsimshian, and Tlingit

Map of Alaska showing the region in which Eyak people originate.The Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian are the Indigenous people of the South East region of Alaska.  More »

Unangax and Alutiiq (Sugpiaq)

‌‌Map of Alaska showing the region in which Aleutian people originate.The Alutiiq, Unangax and Sugpiaq are the indigenous people of the Aleutian Islands.  More »

 

Yup'ik and Cup'ik

Map of Alaska that is highlighted where Yup'ik people originated. The Yupik are the indigenous peoples of the southwestern region of Alaska from Bristol Bay up to the Norton Sound.  More »

ANLC language map

The digital map language map from the Alaska Native Language Center shows in detail the indigenous language regions of Alaska. More »

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